Working on that focus. Best advice this week.

L.M. Sacasas

A couple of weeks ago I read Cheri Lucas’ “Instapaper and My Ideal Intellectual State” with a certain empathetic resignation. Lucas was finding that a new work situation made it increasingly difficult to keep up with the daily torrent of online information coming through all the usual channels — Twitter, RSS feeds, etc. She looked to Instapaper as a way of keeping up a semblance of keeping up, but to no avail. Instapaper quickly became a repository of what might have been read in some ideal world. A site of aspirational knowledge, a kind of Pinterest for the mind (without all the graphical flair).

I get it. This is where I now live too. I haven’t posted in over two weeks. For those of you who have recently started following The Frailest Thing thanks to the whole toilet paper thing — well, first of all, welcome and thank you. Secondly…

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London Sunset over Cannon Street Station

Lovely! (said with or without a British accent…) Hope you enjoyed the trip!

Sat Nav and Cider

Sunset over Cannon Street Station, London, United KingdomOn our last full day in London, my husband and I travelled to the London Bridge to see the Olympic rings hanging from the nearby Tower Bridge. We arrived just in time to witness sunset and so were torn by two competing attractions. This is the westerly attraction: Sunset over Cannon Street Station, which is located at the foot of the Cannon Street Railway Bridge. (The easterly attraction will be the subject of a future post.)

Sunset over Cannon Street Station, London, United KingdomI took this photo after we walked farther out on London Bridge. A perfect end to our Olympics experience.

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Me (not in the photo, just as the writer), blogging last year….

The Social Writer

I’m reminded today that it is ever so important to keep our perspective as we go about our day-to-day, especially in this increasingly “virtual” world that we live in.

A local sportscaster complained that many of his fans on Twitter were insulted that said sportscaster didn’t post all of his show’s tweets personally.  This was not a personal Twitter account, this was his radio show’s Twitter account.  And the expectation was that this host should be spending his days and nights knee deep in tweeting?  Really?  When does he have time for his “real” job then?  And even if it were a personal Twitter account, what about his “real” life?

Other times I’m struck by how personally people take your presence or your absence on Twitter.  As if your world really does (and should) revolve solely around a virtual community of people, the majority of whom you’ve never met (if…

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If only there were an app for PhD camera users like me (that’s Push Here Dummy!)

indilone

Here are some apps which would help you take some amazing pictures using your iPhone camera. These apps are loaded with preset filters and effects to make your picture look more beautiful and professional and the best part is that all of them are free to use. Here is the list.

1. Camera Awesome

This camera app has been developed by SmugMug Inc. and is one of the most downloaded apps on the Apple app Store. Unlike, Apple’s official camera app which has limited features, it offers so many options to optimize your photos and it’s free of cost. Apart from common features like Grid Overlay, image stabilization and multiple shots you can use this app to edit and control the contrast, color saturation and the sharpness of your photos. It also has presets and filters which give you more options to enhance your photos. You would realize the real…

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Would love to drop in here!

ASU Art Museum

Visiting artist Matteo Rubbi, right, explains the game of “Goose” to Museum visitors. Photo by Neil Borowicz.

There was a lot of clucking, growling, mooing and hopping at the ASU Art Museum on Saturday, June 2, and most of all, there was a lot of giggling. The source of the giggling – and all the other sounds – was an artist-led game of “Goose,” patterned after a board game that has been popular in Europe for centuries.

The artist leading the game was Matteo Rubbi, winner of the Furla Foundation Prize for 2011 and one of the first residents of the newly opened ASU Art Museum International Artist Residency facility at Combine Studios in downtown Phoenix, although you’d be forgiven for mistaking him for a gregarious and enthusiastic camp counselor. It’s unlikely that any of the dozens of visitors who played the game that day knew that Frieze magazine calls…

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Most interesting person I’ve read all week!

As Far As I Can Tell

Okay, so there is no smooth transition from Israel to Vietnam – just a sad little apology from me for not blogging for an entire month between trips.  So yes, I came back from Israel, soaked up a little Seoul, started my life as a Samsung employee, and headed straight back out into this big ol’ world.

And this is how we find ourselves in Hanoi…

Our trip to Vietnam started as a pretty typical question between friends – where should we meet?  So, when our chingoos (= amigos, in Korean) suggested Hanoi instead of coffee, we immediately signed up for the adventure.

The four of us landed in Hanoi not knowing what to expect, but we all instantly fell in love with the chaotic, humid mix of city, jungle, East & West.

Most of Hanoi’s central streets are lined with lush trees…

overflowing with noisy motorbikes…

and crowded with food vendors and…

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Adventure on the high seas!

View From Dar

This is the story of how I ended up stranded in a small village on the western coast of Madagascar, beyond the reach of any guidebook or map.

The week before, I had met two travelers from France, P and J, who had told me it was possible to rent a pirogue in Morondava and spend a few days sailing to Morombe, several hundred kilometres down the coast.  I was growing frustrated with the snail-like pace of travel in Madagascar, and this would allow me to bypass some of the most awful roads in the region.  A sailor I met in Morondava explained that it would take four days to reach Morombe, that we would sail in the mornings and I could spend the afternoons exploring fishing villages that are not accessible by road.

On the first day, we left Morondava shortly before sunrise and arrived in Belo-sur-Mer at noon. …

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